.NET Goes Native

by Tyler Jensen 2. April 2014 20:39

I am very excited about the .NET Native project. And while this is just for WinRT app store apps right now, I was encouraged by the commentary in the Channel 9 presentation. I am eager to learn more about it.

For a long time, the speed of desktop processors has spoiled us, allowing us to depend on heavier and heavier JIT workloads and dynamic utilization of multiple core libraries. With the challenges of mobile coming along, we get the benefit of heavy duty platform specific optimization in .NET Native now.

Because I often write server applications in C# that could really benefit from that extra platform optimization, I am hoping and looking forward to being able to utilize .NET Native in my work as well.

Tags:

C# | Commentary | Software Development

Uncle Bob on TDD

by Tyler Jensen 29. January 2014 08:48

I rarely parrot blogs here but sometimes I find a post I don’t want to lose track of. Robert Martin (Uncle Bob), one of my favorites, just posted The Domain Discontinuity which asks the question: Which came first, the chicken or the road?

Two quick pull quotes.

The first has to do with the appropriate scope of TDD. Why do I include this? Because I am not a TDD fanatic. By fanatic, I mean those developers who would disagree with Uncle Bob here, even going so far as to make private and protected methods public just so their tests can access them.

“Let me stress this more. I do not create a test for every method or every class. I create tests that define behaviors, and then I create the methods and classes that implement those behaviors.

“At the start, when there are just a few tests, I might have only one simple method. But as more and more tests are added, that one simple method grows into something too large. So I extract functions and classes from it -- without changing the tests. I generally wind up with a few public methods that are called by my tests, and a large number of private methods and private classes that those public methods call; and that the tests are utterly ignorant of.

“By the way, this is an essential part of good test design. We don't want the tests coupled to the code; and so we restrict the tests to operate through a small set of public methods.”

The second pull quote is a small set of architectural principles that I completely agree with:

    • Refactoring across architectural boundaries is costly.
    • Behaviors extracted across architectural boundaries need newly rewritten tests.
    • Architecture is an up-front activity.

“The solution to that problem is to know in advance where you are going to put certain behaviors. You need to know, in advance, that there will be a boundary between the GUI, the business rules, and the database. You have to know, in advance, that the features of your system have to be broken up into those areas. In short, before you write your first test, you have to ‘dream up the [boundaries] that you wish you had’.”

I sometimes come across systems that are woefully inadequate to the task, extremely difficult to refactor, and have few, if any, tests that do not require integration across boundaries that are often, if not almost impossible, to mock or fake. Virtually all of these problems are attributable to the false notion that Agile means you rush to coding and skip up-front architectural analysis and design.

Thanks, Uncle Bob!

Tags:

Software Development | Commentary

ServiceWire 1.5.0 Released

by Tyler Jensen 25. January 2014 19:42

ServiceWire is a very fast and light weight service host and dynamic client library that simplifies the development and use of high performance remote procedure call (RPC) communication between .NET processes over Named Pipes or TCP/IP.

The DuoVia.Net library has progressed significantly. But everyone I work with who uses it balks at the name. So I’ve renamed it. And I like the name very much. I hope you do too. It is ServiceWire. This name more aptly describes intuitively what the library does. Hopefully this will help with adoption and participation.

I’ve laid out the documentation wiki on that site and will spend the next few days or weeks getting it completely fleshed out. The code is in a new repository and there is a new NuGet package which, with the exception of namespaces, is at perfect parity with DuoVia.Net version 1.5.0.

The company name remains but its flagship open source project has a great new name. I’m very interested in getting your feedback on ServiceWire, the name and the library.

Tags:

C# | DuoVia | ServiceWire

BufferedStream Improves .NET Sockets Performance

by Tyler Jensen 21. January 2014 18:41

.NET’s BufferedStream saved the day, instantly reducing 200-400ms operations across the wire to 1ms. Why? Simple answer, the Socket class returns a NetworkStream. Wire up that stream to a StreamWriter and a StreamReader, and you’re good to go, right? Wrong. Turns out the StreamWriter and StreamReader have a default 16 byte read/write buffer. And NetworkStream has none.

So if you have a TCP socket wired up to a NetworkStream, you’re trying to send or receive just 16 bytes at a time, utterly killing performance over TCP. Now magically wrap that NetworkStream into a BufferedStream and pass that BufferedStream into your StreamReader and StreamWriter and you get instant performance gains that will knock your sockets off.

Backstory: For months I’ve been writing and improving my DuoVia.Net fast services library. And recently the my day job’s team began using it some very clever ways (sorry, NDA and all), but we ran into a major performance problem. While performance on the same machine across processes using Named Pipes was excellent, the same was not true of machine-to-machine communications over TCP/IP. Sub-millisecond calls between services were taking 200-400ms across the wire. Something was terribly wrong. And when we tried Named Pipes from server to server, the performance problem went away. Of course, this was not the final answer because a .NET Named Pipes host can only handle 254 concurrent connections and we need to be able to scale beyond that.

Solving the problem required several sleepless nights and a weekend searching for the answer. My tests for TCP/IP with respect to performance have always run locally on the localhost loopback stack. The trouble with that, I have since learned (and should have known), is that when running locally, the Windows TCP stack bypasses the TCP stack altogether, or nearly so—sufficiently at least to mask the underlying problem of reading and writing only 16 bytes at a time directly on the NetworkStream.

After examining a number of open source implementations of Sockets on a server host, I ran into one or two smart enough to be using the BufferedStream to wrap that NetworkStream that a raw Socket object gives you. While doing all of this research, I also ran into the MSDN explanation (see Remarks and Example section) of how to improve server side asynchronous Socket handling. So I threw that into the solution as well. Once wired up and tested across machines on my home network, I breathed a huge sigh of relief. And here is what the code looks like now. First server and then client.

using System;
using System.Net.Sockets;
using System.Net;
using System.IO;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace DuoVia.Net.TcpIp
{
  public class TcpHost : Host
  {
    private Socket _listener;
    private IPEndPoint _endPoint;
    private ManualResetEvent _listenResetEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);

    /// <summary>
    /// Constructs an instance of the host and starts listening for 
		/// incoming connections on any ip address.
    /// All listener threads are regular background threads.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="port">The port number for incoming requests</param>
    /// <param name="log"></param>
    /// <param name="stats"></param>
    public TcpHost(int port, ILog log = null, IStats stats = null)
    {
      Initialize(new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, port), log, stats);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Constructs an instance of the host and starts listening for incoming 
		/// connections on designated endpoint.
    /// All listener threads are regular background threads.
    /// 
    /// NOTE: the instance created from the specified type 
		/// is not automatically thread safe!
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="endpoint"></param>
    /// <param name="log"></param>
    /// <param name="stats"></param>
    public TcpHost(IPEndPoint endpoint, ILog log = null, IStats stats = null)
    {
      Initialize(endpoint, log, stats);
    }

    private void Initialize(IPEndPoint endpoint, ILog log, IStats stats)
    {
      base.Log = log;
      base.Stats = stats;
      _endPoint = endpoint;
      _listener = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, 
			  SocketType.Stream, ProtocolType.Tcp);
      _listener.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.Socket, 
			  SocketOptionName.KeepAlive, true);
      _listener.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.Socket, 
			  SocketOptionName.DontLinger, true);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the end point this host is listening on
    /// </summary>
    public IPEndPoint EndPoint
    {
      get { return _endPoint; }
    }

    protected override void StartListener()
    {
      Task.Factory.StartNew(Listen, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
    }

    private SocketAsyncEventArgs _acceptEventArg;

    /// <summary>
    /// Listens for incoming tcp requests.
    /// </summary>
    private void Listen()
    {
      try
      {
        _listener.Bind(_endPoint);
        _listener.Listen(8192);

        _acceptEventArg = new SocketAsyncEventArgs();
        _acceptEventArg.Completed 
				  += new EventHandler<SocketAsyncEventArgs>
					   (acceptEventArg_Completed);

        while (!_disposed)
        {
          // Set the event to nonsignaled state.
          _listenResetEvent.Reset();
          _acceptEventArg.AcceptSocket = null;
          try
          {
            if (!_listener.AcceptAsync(_acceptEventArg))
            {
              AcceptNewClient(_acceptEventArg);
            }
          }
          catch (Exception ex)
          {
            _log.Error("Listen error: {0}", 
						  ex.ToString().Flatten());
            break; //break loop on unhandled
          }

          // Wait until a connection is made before continuing.
          _listenResetEvent.WaitOne();
        }
      }
      catch (Exception e)
      {
        _log.Fatal("Listen fatal error: {0}", e.ToString().Flatten());
      }
    }

    private void acceptEventArg_Completed(object sender, 
		  SocketAsyncEventArgs e)
    {
      AcceptNewClient(e);
    }

    private void AcceptNewClient(SocketAsyncEventArgs e)
    {
      try
      {
        if (e.SocketError != SocketError.Success)
        {
          if (!_disposed) _listenResetEvent.Set();
          return;
        }

        Socket activeSocket = null;
        BufferedStream stream = null;
        try
        {
          activeSocket = e.AcceptSocket;

          // Signal the listening thread to continue.
          _listenResetEvent.Set();

          stream = new BufferedStream
					  (new NetworkStream(activeSocket), 8192);
          base.ProcessRequest(stream);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
          _log.Error("AcceptNewClient_ProcessRequest error: {0}", 
					  ex.ToString().Flatten());
        }
        finally
        {
          if (null != stream)
          {
            stream.Close();
          }
          if (null != activeSocket && activeSocket.Connected)
          {
            try
            {
              activeSocket.Shutdown(SocketShutdown.Both);
            }
            catch (Exception shutdownException)
            {
              _log.Error("AcceptNewClient_ActiveSocketShutdown error: {0}", 
							  shutdownException.ToString().Flatten());
            }

            try
            {
              activeSocket.Close();
            }
            catch (Exception closeException)
            {
              _log.Error("AcceptNewClient_ActiveSocketClose error: {0}", 
							  closeException.ToString().Flatten());
            }
          }
        }
      }
      catch (Exception fatalException)
      {
        _log.Fatal("AcceptNewClient fatal error: {0}", 
				  fatalException.ToString().Flatten());
      }
    }

    #region IDisposable Members

    private bool _disposed = false;

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
      if (!_disposed)
      {
        _disposed = true; //prevent second call to Dispose
        if (disposing)
        {
          _listenResetEvent.Set();
          _acceptEventArg.Dispose();
          _listener.Close();
          _listenResetEvent.Close();
        }
      }
      base.Dispose(disposing);
    }

    #endregion
  }
}

Client code:

using System;
using System.Net;
using System.Net.Sockets;
using System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary;
using System.IO;

namespace DuoVia.Net.TcpIp
{
  public class TcpChannel : StreamingChannel
  {
    private Socket _client;

    /// <summary>
    /// Creates a connection to the concrete object handling 
    /// method calls on the server side
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="serviceType"></param>
    /// <param name="endpoint"></param>
    public TcpChannel(Type serviceType, IPEndPoint endpoint)
    {
      _serviceType = serviceType;
      _client = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, 
        SocketType.Stream, ProtocolType.Tcp);
      _client.LingerState.Enabled = false;
      _client.Connect(endpoint);
      if (!_client.Connected) throw new SocketException(); 
      _stream = new BufferedStream(new NetworkStream(_client), 8192);
      _binReader = new BinaryReader(_stream);
      _binWriter = new BinaryWriter(_stream);
      _formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
      SyncInterface(_serviceType);
    }

    public override bool IsConnected 
    { 
      get 
      { 
        return (null != _client) && _client.Connected; 
      } 
    }

    #region IDisposable override

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
      base.Dispose(disposing);
      if (disposing)
      {
        _binReader.Close();
        _binWriter.Close();
        _client.Close();
      }
    }

    #endregion
  }
}

You can find all of the DuoVia.Net code on GitHub or install the package from NuGet.

Tags:

C# | Code | DuoVia

My Technical 2013

by Tyler Jensen 1. January 2014 12:48

Technically speaking, I had a fun and productive 2013. Here are some highlights worth mentioning.

StorageClient: Client Side Load Balancing

A technology specific problem solved, bypassing server based solution with client side load balancing and fast fail retry algorithms that took us from horrible to nearly 5 nines in reliability while improving overall performance. (This was at the day job, so that's about as much as I can share about that.)

LocalCache: In Memory Cache with Async Persistence

A library that takes advantage of Concurrent Collections in .NET and SQLite to provide fast in-memory caching that persists asynchronously on local disk for rapid rehydration of in-memory cache when an application pool is recycled. This solved a big problem with service level compliance recovery on a critical service, taking complete recovery time from hours to a few minutes. (Also for the day job.)

DuoVia.Net: TCP and NamedPipes Services Library

An extension and revival of RemotingLite that makes intra-process communication easy and fast. This was my first foray into creating and sharing open source software on GitHub and publishing packages on NuGet. I enjoyed it so much, I added 8 more packages to the set. And while these projects were built on my own time, one or two of them are in regular use by one or two teams at the current day job and they have been downloaded over 1,500 times.

VersionedCollections: A Shared Idea Brought to Life

Recently I shared an idea with Ayende Rahien on his blog with respect to creating a snapshot-in-time, read-only view of a collection that is being written to constantly. I'm happy to report that it turned out to be exactly what he needed. And I am honored and appreciative to Ayende for the kudos. Sharing good ideas with community friends is almost as much fun as bringing them to life yourself.

Here's to an equally fun and productive 2014.

Tags:

DuoVia | Personal | Software Development

Me...

Tyler Jensen

Tyler Jensen
.NET Developer and Architect

Month List

Other Stuff